Skip Navigation
Last Visited »

Important Global Message

Maintenance Alert

The Miami-Dade County Portal will be undergoing maintenance starting at 11 p.m. Saturday, May 3 and for all of Sunday, May 4. Intermittent outages may be experienced. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Thank you for your patience as we improve our online services.

An Evaluation of the CHR Mediation Program

In January 1998, the CHR implemented a mediation program, which put into practice the methods of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). This program partnership with Nova Southeastern University's School of Social and Systematic Studies, Department of Dispute Resolution, assists parties in a formal dispute to resolve the case with mediation before the agency begins the investigation into the allegations of discrimination.

Both parties must agree to mediate. If the mediation should reach an impasse, the aggrieved party has the option to have the CHR investigate the case and proceed with the administrative process.

In June 1999, the CHR began administering a survey aimed at gauging the participants' perceptions of satisfaction with the agency's mediation program. The questionnaire encompassed perceptions of satisfaction with the process, the mediator and the results of the mediation. The questionnaires were administered after the mediation, placed in sealed envelopes and returned to the ADR coordinator.

The survey results over the years have revealed that a high majority of the participants reported being satisfied or highly satisfied with the mediators and the process of mediation.

The preliminary study revealed that a high majority of the participants reported being satisfied or highly satisfied with the process of mediation except for control over the process. A majority of the participants reported being satisfied or highly satisfied with the mediator, yet the charging parties did not rate the overall performance of the mediator as high as the respondents did.

The charging parties reported lower rates of satisfaction with outcomes on questions of satisfaction with the results, opportunity to contribute, and meeting expectations. This may be due to employees having expected more (expected the best) and employers having expected less (expected the worst), but the majority of respondents were satisfied or highly satisfied that mediation met their expectations.

Back to Top Page Last Edited: Fri May 18, 2012 3:33:24 PM
humanrights
Human Rights
 
 
Corner
Corner

You are now leaving the official website of Miami-Dade County government. Please be aware that when you exit this site, you are no longer protected by our privacy or security policies. Miami-Dade County is not responsible for the content provided on linked sites. The provision of links to these external sites does not constitute an endorsement.

Please click 'OK' to be sent to the new site, or Click 'Cancel' to go back.