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Community Redevelopment

The Community Redevelopment and Municipal Services Division (CRMSD) of the Office of Management and Budget is responsible for the oversight and management of Community Redevelopment Areas within Miami-Dade County.

Part 3 of Chapter 163 Of Florida State Statutes, known as the “Community Redevelopment Act of 1969” authorized local governments to establish Community Redevelopment Agencies (CRA) to revitalize areas designated as slum and blight.

Primary Community Redevelopment objectives as defined by the legislation are:

  • To address the physical, social, and economic problems associated with slum and blighted areas
  • To encourage local government to improve the physical environment (i.e. buildings, streets, parks, utilities) through rehabilitation, conservation, or clearance/rehabilitation
  • To convey local community redevelopment agencies the power to expend public funds as a means to improve slum and blighted areas
  • To eliminate substandard housing conditions and to provide adequate housing to residents of low or moderate income, particularly the elderly

CRA Criteria

CRAs are a common government tool for redevelopment in Florida, and they operate on a budget generated by the increase in property taxes within the areas. Once the CRA is established, a percentage of the increase in real property taxes goes to the CRA. This tax increment is used to fund and finance the redevelopment projects outlined in the Community Redevelopment Plan.

In order to be designated as a redevelopment area, the area must meet the criteria outlined in Chapter 163.340, Florida Statutes. Areas can be designated as blighted if:

  • There is a substantial number of slum, deteriorated, or deteriorating structures and conditions that endanger life or property by fire or other causes or one or more of the following factors which substantially impairs or arrests the sound growth of a county or municipality and is a menace to the public health, safety, morals, or welfare in its present condition and use.
   
  • There is faulty or inadequate street layout; inadequate parking facilities; or roadways, bridges, or public transportation facilities incapable of handling the volume of traffic flow into or through the area, either at present or following proposed construction
 
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Financing

CRA are financed  based upon a method known as Tax Increment Financing (TIF). It is a unique tool available to cities and counties for the redevelopment of urban areas. It is used to leverage public funds to promote private sector activity. Property values in a CRA are capped or frozen at the assessed value in a base year, the year when a CRA is created. Thereafter, certain tax revenues due to increases in property value in excess of the base year value are deposited into the CRA Trust Fund and can only be spent in the redevelopment area.

Taxing entities, which contribute to the tax increment, continue to receive property tax revenues based on frozen value. These remain available for general government purposes. Any funds received by a tax increment financing area must be used for specific redevelopment purposes outlined in the statute and contained in the CRA redevelopment plan, and not for general government purposes.

The Community Redevelopment Act calls for private sector involvement to the maximum extent possible, to coordinate public and private sector initiatives and successfully revitalize communities which would otherwise further decline. Tax increment revenues can be used immediately, saved for a particular project or can be bonded to maximize the funds available.

CRA are a specifically focused financing tool for redevelopment. The Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division Boards do not establish policy for the County - they develop and administer a plan to implement that policy. The Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division acts officially as a body distinct and separate from the governing body, even when it is the same group of people.

The CRA term is limited top 30 years. After the sun setting of a CRA, or in the event that all TIF revenues cannot be reserved for, or open on any eligible projects, any remaining CRA Trust Funds are returned to each taxing authority on a pro-rata basis.

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Objectives

Primary Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division objectives as defined by Florida Statutes of the redevelopment legislation:

  • To address the physical, social and economic problems associated with slums and blighted areas;
     
  • To encourage local units of government to improve the physical environment (I.e. buildings, streets, utilities, parks, etc.) by means of rehabilitation, conservation, or clearance/redevelopment;
     
  • To convey to local community redevelopment agencies the powers to expend public funds, and other general powers as a means by which slums and blighted areas can be improved;
     
  • To enhance the tax base in the redevelopment areas by encouraging private investment through channeling of tax increment revenues into public improvements within the designated areas; and
     
  • To eliminate substandard housing conditions and to provide adequate amounts of housing in good condition to residents of low or moderate income, particularly to the elderly.
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Framework

The Board of County Commissioners created or approved the creation of eleven (11) existing community redevelopment areas that are governed by the Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division boards and overseen by the County.

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Plan

The Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division is responsible for developing and implementing the Community Redevelopment Plan that addresses the unique needs of the targeted area. The plan includes the overall goals for redevelopment in the area, as well as identifying the types of projects planned for the area.

Examples of traditional projects include: streetscapes and roadway improvements, building renovations, new building construction, flood control initiatives, water and sewer improvements parking lots and garages, neighborhood parks, sidewalks and street tree plantings. The plan can also include redevelopment incentives such as grants and loans for such things as facade improvements, sprinkler system upgrades, signs, and structural improvements. The redevelopment plan is a living document that can be updated to meet the changing needs within the Community Redevelopment Area; however, the boundaries of the area cannot be changed without starting the process from the beginning.

It is the County's position that the Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division plans should be focused on specific and catalytic projects, that all financing tools available should be considered to implement that plan, and that each CRA should have clearly defined objectives, reasons for creation and also a viable exit strategy. 

 

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Process

A public meeting begins the designation process. Several steps will have to be accomplished before the Community Redevelopment Area becomes a reality.

  1. Adopt the Finding of Necessity. This will formally identify the blight conditions within the targeted area and establish the area boundary. Once approved by the County the CRA Board can be setup. Typically, the CRA Board's first action will be to prepare a plan.
     
  2. Develop and adopt the Community Redevelopment Plan. The plan addresses the unique needs of the targeted area and includes the overall goals for redevelopment in the area, as well as identifying specific projects. The CRA Board must approve the plan with local planning advisory boards approval and a public hearing prior to submission to the County for approval.
     
  3. Create a Redevelopment Trust Fund. Establishment of the Trust Fund enables the Community Redevelopment and Economic Policy Analysis Division to direct the increase in real property tax revenues back into the targeted area. This step will be accomplished through a County ordinance.
  4. Proposed CRAs

    This page contains a listing of proposed Community Redevelopment Areas (CRAs).

    TIF Meetings

    See the meetings and agendas for the Tax Increment Financing and Coordinating Committee.

    BCC Meetings

    See the meetings and agendas for the Board of County Commissioner Committee meetings.

    Approved CRAs

    This page contains a listing of approved Community Redevelopment Areas (CRAs).

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Page Last Edited: Wed Nov 7, 2012 3:30:35 PM
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