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Water Flouridation

The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department's three regional water plants fluoridate the water during the treatment process. Fluoride is a compound that contains fluorine, one of the most plentiful elements on earth. It occurs naturally in water supplies.

According to the American Association of Pediatric Dentistry, "using small amounts of fluoride on a routine basis can help prevent tooth decay." Both the American Dental Association and the American Association of Pediatric Dentistry recommend that fluoride be added to community water supplies in areas where fluoride does not occur naturally. Fluoridation is also endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which considers "community water fluoridation as one of 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century."

Whereas fluoridated drinking water provides only about one-third to one-half the amount of fluoride that an individual should be getting on a daily basis, it is a benefit that cuts across socioeconomic dividers, offering everyone equal health benefits.

The American Dental Association supports community water fluoridation as the single most effective public health measure to prevent tooth decay:  "Water Fluoridation is a powerful strategy to reduce disparities in tooth decay among different populations and is more cost-effective than other forms of fluoride treatments or applications."

Facts about flouridation in tap water

  • Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral found in both surface water and groundwater.
  • Since 1958, the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department has adjusted the existing natural fluoride level of 0.2 parts per million in the water to the optimal range for dental health of 0.7 parts per million.
  • Fluoride helps teeth resist decay by strengthening the protective layer of tooth enamel and can reverse newly formed cavities.
  • Community water fluoridation is supported by most major national and international health service organizations. Supporters include the American Dental Association, American Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Fluoridation does not change the taste, odor or appearance of your water.
  • No evidence exists that fluoridated water at the levels prescribed for human consumption is harmful to animals or pets.
Back to Top Page Last Edited: Tue Jul 3, 2012 10:07:36 AM
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