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Anti-Tethering Training

Here are some alternatives to chaining and some training tips.

  • Install a fence on your property with a 45-degree inward extension so that your dog cannot jump over it.
  • If you do not have a fenced yard and your dog will be living indoors now, purchase a few dog toys that are intended for chewing. Having appropriate objects available will discourage your dog from taking inappropriate objects or being destructive in the house.
  • If you're having trouble walking your dog (because they lunge and pull), consider using a gentle leader head collar or front clip harness. Both of these special collars give you more control over your dog and will ease their transition from being tied out to walking with you when it's time to go outside.
  • Carry dog treats with you each time you take your dog outside to eliminate. This way, you can give him a treat when he goes outside, reinforcing that outside is the best and only place he should be eliminating.
  • Contact a trainer immediately if your dog exhibits any guarding behaviors related to food (growling, snapping, lunging). A trainer can help coach you through how to resolve this behavior so that your family stays safe.
  • Remember that what goes in must come out! Dogs get the urge to eliminate after four normal activities: waking up, running around, after eating and after drinking water. Allow your dog to go outside within 10 minutes after eating and drinking at meal times, as well as first thing in the morning or after a long nap.

Anti-Tethering Training
For training assistance for your chained dog, leave a voicemail at (305) 884-1877 and a volunteer trainer will call you back. (Maximum 3 calls per owner)

History

Animal Services was originally a part of the Dade County Public Safety Department, and was later designated as the Animal Care and Control Division under the Public Works Department.

In 2001, the Miami-Dade Police Department took over the operation, and on October 1, 2005, the Animal Services Department (ASD) was created as a stand-alone entity in an effort to provide focused care for the County’s animal population. By becoming an independent entity, the Animal Services Department will be able to concentrate its resources on its core mission of caring for the animals in its custody. ASD receives approximately 22 percent of its budget from the County’s General Operating Fund, while the remaining 78 percent is derived through dog license tag sales, shelter fees, enforcement fines, private grants, and donations.

Back to Top Page Last Edited: Mon Dec 12, 2011 12:59:47 PM
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